Going to have to get a copy of this paper

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The local library has wonderful access to Journals - check with them and see if this is available:

Testing four competing theories of health-protective behavior
Four competing theories of health-protective behavior are reviewed: the health belief model, the theory of reasoned action, protection motivation theory, and subjective expected utility theory. In spite of their commonalities, these models are seldom tested against one another. The review points out the similarities and differences among these theories and the data analyses needed to compare them. In addition to describing the content of the models, their conceptualization of key variables, and the combinatorial rules used to make predictions, some general problems in theory development and testing for health behaviors are examined. The article's goal is to help investigators design studies that will clarify the strengths and weaknesses of these models, leading toward a better understanding of health behavior.

This popped up on my screen when someone referenced the concept of Fear Appeal
From Infogalactic:

Fear appeal
Fear appeal is a term used in psychology, sociology and marketing. It generally describes a strategy for motivating people to take a particular action, endorse a particular policy, or buy a particular product, by arousing fear. A well-known example in television advertising was a commercial employing the musical jingle: "Never pick up a stranger, pick up Prestone anti-freeze." This was accompanied by images of shadowy strangers (hitchhikers) who would presumably do one harm if picked up. The commercial's main appeal was not to the positive features of Prestone anti-freeze, but to the fear of what a "strange" brand might do.

A fear appeal is a persuasive message that attempts to arouse fear in order to divert behavior through the threat of impending danger or harm. It presents a risk, presents the vulnerability to the risk, and then may, or may not suggest a form of protective action.

And of course, there are subsets:

Health belief model
The health belief model predicts that perceived susceptibility and severity of a risk motivates individuals to engage in preventive actions, and the type of preventative action depends on the perceived benefits and hindrances of performing the action.

A fear argument based on the health belief model is typically presented in terms of the likelihood and severity of health consequences if the current behavior is not changed. With the health belief model, it is unclear whether self-efficacy is directly considered a cost of performing a suggested action because occasionally, a fear appeal is thought to be less effective if a difficulty of acting is considered a cost of acting.

Game, set and match.  This is what the globalists are using to get us to comply - first with the vax and then they will ratchet it up until we are complying with their every whim.  We will own nothing, we will rent everything, we will work for the state, the state will take care of us and we will be happy. Agenda 2030

If you believe that, I have a bridge for sale in downtown Manhatten that you might be interested in.  I love the last thought though - "because occasionally, a fear appeal is thought to be less effective if a difficulty of acting is considered a cost of acting"  Yes. The cost of acting.  Do you get the jab.  Side effects? Do you die from it? They are selling the jab with fear and they do not realize that there is a push-back to this.  That is why I want to read the paper.  See if there is a way to defuse the fear - see what the author found out.

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This page contains a single entry by DaveH published on October 7, 2021 8:42 PM.

A simple question - getting the jab was the previous entry in this blog.

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