Recently in Energy Category

Shareef don't like it

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Interesting happenings with the price of oil now that the United States is a net exporter - from Zero Hedge:

Saudi Arabia Starts All-Out Oil War: MbS Destroys OPEC By Flooding Market, Slashing Oil Prices
With the commodity world still smarting from the Nov 2014 Saudi decision to (temporarily) break apart OPEC, and flood the market with oil in (failed) hopes of crushing US shale producers (who survived thanks to generous banks extending loan terms and even more generous buyers of junk bonds), which nonetheless resulted in a painful manufacturing recession as the price of Brent cratered as low as the mid-$20's in late 2015/early 2016, on Saturday, Saudi Arabia launched its second scorched earth, or rather scorched oil campaign in 6 years. And this time there will be blood.

Following Friday's shocking collapse of OPEC+, when Russia and Riyadh were unable to reach an agreement during the OPEC+ summit in Vienna which was seeking up to 1.5 million b/d in further oil production cuts, on Saturday Saudi Arabia kick started what Bloomberg called an all-out oil war, slashing official pricing for its crude and making the deepest cuts in at least 20 years on its main grades, in an effort to push as many barrels into the market as possible.

In the first major marketing decision since the meeting, the Saudi state producer Aramco, which successfully IPOed just before the price of oil cratered...

Without the oil revenues, the Arabs have nothing. Zip. Zero. Zilch. All of their glamorous cities and apparent wealth is a crude maquette propped up by the continuous influx of hard currency from oil exports. Lose that and they lose their world status. I do not doubt that they have forseen this day and have solid investments to carry them forward but still, sucks to be them right now. Some serious belt tightening is in order.

Title of the post? One of my favorite Clash songs:

Looks like these two nations see the hype behind the climate change scare and see it for what it is. Political and not scientific. From Watts Up With That comes this essay with some inconvenient numbers:

China and India rejecting renewables for coal-fired futures
China and India are NOT buying into the global alarm movement. Never in human history have we seen two countries (China and India), each with over a billion people, in need of such gargantuan amounts of energy to keep their economies accelerating and their citizens alive.

China and India are the two most populous countries in the world. As of 2018, China had almost 1.4 billion people, a figure that is projected to grow to 1.5 billion by 2045. India accounted for approximately 1.3 billion people in 2018 and is expected to grow to almost 1.7 billion by 2045.

Though China has spent more on clean energy than any other country and is pushing to burn natural gas (a different fossil fuel) instead of coal to counter smog, it’s still pumping money at home and abroad into coal-fired generation.

Bloomber reports that China has enough coal-fired power plants in the pipeline to match the entire capacity of the European Union, driving the expansion in global coal power and confounding the movement against the polluting fossil fuel.

Over half (5,884) of the world’s coal power plants (10,210) are in China and India whose populations of mostly poor peoples is roughly 2.7 billion. Together they are in the process of building 634 new ones. They are putting their money and backs into their most abundant source of energy – coal.

More at the site.

Makes a lot of sense - coal is cheap, abundant and we have about 500 years of known reserves at the current rate of consumption. We would be foolish not to use it - especially developing nations who do not have the financial resources to blow taxpayer money on pie-in-the-sky scams schemes for elusive magic unicorn energy. Coal in its native state is not a clean fuel but the scrubbing technology is mature and cheap to implement - even cheaper when integrating it into a new plant. You would be stupid not to use it.

Headlines a few days ago about Bill Gates buying a hydrogen-powered yacht. The designer, Sinot, says no today.
Here is a screen-cap from their website:

20200211-sinot.jpg

I was wondering as we do not have the hydrogen infrastructure and even in the best of situations, it will cost many more times to run than bunker or diesel. Hydrogen is not a fuel. It has never been a fuel and it never will be a fuel. It is an energy-transport mechanism. It is created with energy and it yields energy when combusted.

Still get a foul taste saying those two words - the guy thought he was an intellectual but in reality, he was just a narcissistic tool of radical socialists. Absolutely classical case of Dunning-Kruger Effect. From Watts Up With That.

The post is about yet another failure of a much-touted alternative energy scheme:

It is in the news, as expected Crescent Dunes, the world largest concentrated solar power plant featuring 10 hours of molten salt thermal energy storage, just went bust.

https://www.reviewjournal.com/opinion/letters/letter-much-touted-crescent-dunes-solar-plant-goes-bust-1935510/

https://www.cato.org/blog/crescent-dunes-another-green-flop

https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/another-federally-backed-solar-energy-project-just-went-belly-116506

From the Infogalactic entry for Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project

20200204-crescent.jpgDividing One Billion Dollars (total cost so far) by the 418,849 MW-h brings us the cost to the customer of the electricity. I will scale it to the more familiar kiloWatt per hour. Here in the Pacific Northwest, we pay about 10¢ per 1kW-h. The cost of the electricity generated by this facility is $2.38 kW-h. All of the overruns and expenses are coming out of our wallets - this is all tax-payer subsidies. The projected cost to market of this electricity was 0.08kW-h. Fat Chance.

This is why alt.energy will never work. It is not reliable. It doesn't operate at night. It is not baseload. This last is the most important. The dirty little secret is that for every 100MW (100,000,000,000 watts) of alt.energy generation capacity, there is another 100MW of natural gas turbine running on standby for when the wind stops blowing or when the sky gets cloudy.

Modern nuclear is the way to go. Every single nuclear accident that has happened so far has been with a reactor whose basic design is more than 60 years old. Think of the progress of technology - computers, cell phones, televisions, medical equipment, etc... Imagine what a modern nuclear reactor would be like - smaller, cheaper and walk-away safe. We have them, we need to show the political will to build them.

And speaking of light - some common sense

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From Reuters:

U.S. rolls back standards on energy saving light bulbs
The Trump administration on Friday said it has finalized a decision to roll back a 2007 rule calling for energy-efficient light bulbs, a move that states including New York and California are challenging in the courts.

The administration finalized a proposal made in September to roll back the standard that Congress passed in 2007 when George W. Bush, a Republican, was president and which was to come into effect next year. The Department of Energy said that increasing the efficiency of bulbs could cost consumers more than 300% compared to incandescent bulbs and that Americans do not need regulation because many are already buying efficient bulbs.

Great news - when the temps are cold, I use incandescent bulbs in a reflector to keep my hummingbird feeders warm. It has been getting really difficult to find them at the local box store. A bit more:

The move is part of the administration’s push to ease regulations by requiring agencies to ditch two old regulations for each one they propose.

Thank you President Trump. And of course, the nanny staters want to enforce what is "best" for us:

The roll back on light bulbs has been challenged in court by 15 states and Washington, D.C. who say it would harm state efforts to fight emissions blamed for climate change.

Environmental groups decried the decision. The Natural Resources Defense Council, a nonprofit, said it would cost consumers $14 billion in energy bills annually and create the need to generate the amount of electricity provided by an additional 30 500-megawatt power plants.

Excuse me but I am perfectly capable of looking at what I want to do and making an informed decision. Thank you very much. The NRDC does not represent me. I do not have to kowtow to their non-scientific emotional appeals.

Peak Oil - some actual numbers

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A great post from al fin next level - the headline is: Just. Wow.

Oil: For Every Barrel Consumed, Two Are Discovered

“For every barrel of oil consumed over the past 35 years, two new barrels have been discovered.” In other words, technology has increased the available oil despite the fact that humans have been using it at an increasing rate for over a century. For the past 15 or so years, fracking (and directional drilling) is the main reason that proved reserves have increased. __ https://www.e-education.psu.edu/emsc240/node/527

Peak Oil Armageddon is postponed, as global oil reserves keep rising.

Much more at the site. I knew we had oil reserves but had no idea they were so massive. We are set for the next couple hundred years at least and that is not counting new abiogenic deposits. More than enough time to get a decent intelligent nuclear design scaled out.

Life in a 3rd world nation - California

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Power going out again. From their Pacific Gas and Electric blog:

PG&E Could Shut Off Power for Safety in Portions of 16 Counties on Wednesday; Six Other Counties, Previously Targeted for Shutoff, Will Not Be De-Energized
Customers in portions of 16 counties have been given a 24-hour notification by PG&E about a potential Public Safety Power Shutoff (PSPS) starting Wednesday morning.

Gee - if they had only taken some of their money and used it to maintain their infrastructure instead of blowing it on various alternative energy rat-holes, they would not have to do this.

Nuclear power is the way to go.

Nice chunk of change - Volkswagon

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Nope - no corruption here. From Deutsche Welle (German World):

German government expands subsidies for electric cars
The German government and car industry have agreed to increase joint subsidies for the purchase of electric cars on the same day automobile giant Volkswagen began production of a new all-electric vehicle.

The agreement between the government and the automobile industry was reached following a Monday evening "car summit" aimed at fostering the mass production of cleaner transportation. 

And how much?

Under the agreement, consumer subsidies for electric cars costing less than €40,000 ($44,500) will increase to €6,000 (about $6,700) from €4,000. Purchasers of plug-in hybrids in this price range would be given a subsidy of €4,500, up from €3,000.

This money is coming out of German taxpayer's wallets and is being used to subsidize coal-burning cars. Electricity is not a fuel, it is an energy transport medium and these cars are burning coal and natural gas.

I wonder who Volkswagon had to bribe to get this free lunch.

The California winds

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Following up on Cliff Mass' forecast earlier today, PG&E is in a spot of trouble - from Zero Hedge:

California Faces "Biggest Blackout Ever" As 2.5 Million PG&E Customers May Have No Power For Days
Earlier this week we joked that with PG&E now scrambling to enforce intentional blackouts every time there are powerful winds for fears the bankrupt company's aged infrastructure could cause a new fire, "every time the wind blows California will become Venezuela."

Turns out it wasn't a joke.

On Friday, with its stock crashing to a new all time low amid speculation it may have been responsible for the latest California inferno, the Kincade Fire...

20191026-PG&E.jpg

... PG&E warned it will shut off power again on Saturday to as many as 2.5 million people as violent winds batter the state, in what according to Bloomberg will be "California’s largest intentional blackout ever."

According to a Friday statement, approximately 850,000 homes and businesses in Northern California, including much of the San Francisco Bay Area, may be impacted beginning Saturday evening. And with data models indicating the weather event could be the most powerful in California in decades, with widespread dry Northeast winds between 45-60 miles per hour (mph) and peak gusts of 60-70 mph in the higher elevations through Monday, large swaths of the region could be without power for days.

Bay Area? This is going to be brutal. If only they had taken some of their money and spent it on maintaining their infrastructure instead of building pie-in-the-sky alt.energy pipe dreams. Rooftop solar that feeds the grid instead of local storage? Insane.

BTW - out of morbid curiosity, I checked and it is now trading for $5/share. Looking at the decade view, you can see a nice steady climb until mid to late 2017 when it peaked at $70 and then it is down the tubes after that.

A  modicum of Googling will show you why. The beginnings of the idea that their infrastructure was failing and they ceased paying dividends on their shares of stock. If I had some FYM, I might be tempted to buy a few thousand shares but they will probably reorganize into a different corporate entity to screw out all shareholders (and employee pension obligations). Nice people.

California power line problems

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With all of their preemptive blackouts, this still happened - from One America News:

Power Lines Suspected Of Igniting The Saddleridge Fire In Calif.
Authorities believe a power line is to blame for last week’s deadly wildfire in California. According to an official statement Monday, power lines are suspected of igniting the the Saddleridge Fire in Los Angeles County. The blaze, which was 44 percent contained as of Monday, has been blamed for two deaths as well as the destruction of 17 homes and structures.

According to the Los Angeles Fire Department, the fire started in a 50-by-70 foot perimeter beneath a high voltage transmission tower on October 10th. The utility company which owns that tower, Southern California Edison, confirmed its systems were impacted at the time it reportedly started.

The article talks a bit about this fire and others and then closes with these two paragraphs:

Power lines belonging to the state’s largest utility company, Pacific Gas and Electric, has been blamed for several deadly wildfires in the past. One of these fires includes last year’s Paradise Fire, which is now considered the states most destructive in history. This particular wildfire resulted in 85 deaths. The company has been forced to file for bankruptcy because of this after it was forced to pay victims damages.

Meanwhile, it remains unclear what will happen to Southern California Edison if they are found guilty of starting the blaze in Los Angeles.

All of the money that they sunk into various alt.energy scams - they should have been maintaining their infrastructure.

Very good news - nuclear

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From Bloomberg:

INSIGHT: NELA—A Big, Bipartisan Opportunity for Nuclear Power
Nuclear science is hard, and most Americans don’t realize how close our country is to losing the skills and experience needed to engineer, construct, and operate nuclear reactors—something that will have deleterious effects on national security, electricity reliability, and the climate.

On Sept. 20, Three Mile Island shuttered for good after decades of service providing power to customers across Pennsylvania. The generator’s closure underscores a grim fact: Our nuclear fleet is aging rapidly and struggling to remain competitive even as the demand for clean renewable energy continues to climb. Without investment in education, research and development, and reactor design, America risks falling behind in this critical area.

Very true - what is to be done:

Stop America’s Nuclear Bran Drain
Without better technology and legislative action, utilities are unlikely to invest in nuclear power. It is past time for Congress to take action to stop America’s nuclear brain drain.

The Nuclear Energy Leadership Act (NELA), sponsored by Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) in the Senate with a House companion by Rep. Elaine Luria (D-Va.), is a bipartisan proposal to support the continued development of American advanced nuclear technologies by boosting investment in research and development, fuel security, and workforce development.

This legislation addresses the short, middle, and long-term needs of the nuclear generation industry over the next decade. It would establish goals that align federal lab and private-sector efforts to help accelerate nuclear power generation, while also supporting research and development to ensure the safety and reliability necessary to license new, state-of-the-art concepts.

This still does not address the building of new technology reactors (LFTR anyone?). These designs are walk-away safe and much cheaper to build. Still, a wonderful start and they are recognizing that this problem exists.

From Fast Company:

Tesla owners in California get a warning to charge their cars before the power goes out
Pacific General & Electric (PG&E) is cutting power across large swaths of Northern California, including the Bay Area, in a drastic bid to prevent wildfires.

Now Tesla is warning people that before they settle into their outage outrage, they should really charge up their electric cars.

You see, electric cars are great options—except when there is no way to power them up. To be as proactive as PG&E, after hearing the news of the impending power cut, Tesla jumped into action, sending out an in-car alert to the dashboard display warning owners to charge their vehicles fully ahead of the outage.

I love my electric bicycle and use it several times/week but it is not my primary transportation and I would never have a electric vehicle as my primary transportation without an alternative way to keep it charged (solar panels are useless unless you put in a large array).

Besides, your average Tesla owner is charging their vehicle with coal. Supplies about 70% of US power.

As liberal heads start exploding

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The outrage I tell you... Yawn... From FOX News:

Feds open California land to oil, gas drilling, aiming to strengthen energy independence
The federal government has opened hundreds of thousands of acres of public lands in California for oil and gas drilling as part of a broader effort to strengthen energy independence.

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) issued its final decision Friday, allowing oil and gas leases on plots mostly in the Central Valley and parts of the Central Coast.

The 725,000 acres of public land in Central California had been off-limits to oil and gas drilling since 2013.

Another shred of Barry's "legacy" in the dumpster where it belongs.

From Jalopnik:

How China Built Some Of The World’s Most Versatile Vehicles Around A $150 Engine
Back in 2015, I visited China and found myself enamored by a vehicle so simple that it didn’t even have a hood to cover its single-cylinder diesel engine. That basic motor, which can be cranked by hand, is a part of what I later found to be one of the most incredible modular vehicle architectures I’d ever seen.

More:

At the time, I didn’t know what this thing was, all I knew was that it was the first stock, street-legal vehicle I’d ever seen with a completely exposed engine, and it steered kind of funny. Also, it was everywhere, working on farms, hauling dirt at construction sites, and popping around the city carrying cargo. Everywhere I turned, I saw a tiny diesel engine hanging off the front of various types of vehicles, so I had to learn more.

Completely modular - here are three photos and a video:

20191006-tuo-la-ji-01.jpg

20191006-tuo-la-ji-02.jpg

20191006-tuo-la-ji-03.jpg

Shades of the old-school Lister engines which are still being manufactured in places like India and East Asia.

Cheap to buy, economical to run. Completely modular and extensible. What's not to love...

Renewable resources - wind

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The dirty side to wind power - they don't last forever. Quite a short lifetime actually. From the Cowboy State Daily:

Wind turbine blades being disposed of in Casper landfill
The Casper landfill will soon be the home of more than 1,000 decommissioned wind turbine blades and motor housing units.

According to Cindie Langston, solid waste manager for the Casper Regional Landfill, the materials will be deposited in an area of the landfill designed to hold construction and demolition material.

CRL is one of the few landfills with the proper permits and certifications to accept the decommissioned turbine materials.

The turbine disposal project, which started this summer, is slated to continue until the spring of 2020, bringing the CRL estimated revenue of $675,485. Such “special waste projects” bring in about $800,000 a year, which helps keep CRL rates low, Langston said.

20191001-wind.jpg

The turbines last about 20 years and are then completely taken down - no option to rebuild. Not exactly renewable.

From Pierce Points:

WILL THIS TRUMP MOVE TRIGGER A COAL AND NUCLEAR BUILDING SPREE?
You probably haven’t heard about it. But one of the most critical energy developments in years is now gearing up for a major battle in America.

That’s a slate of new regulations around power pricing across the U.S. Which have been proposed by the Trump-era Department of Energy (DOE), in order to give coal and nuclear power generation a boost — opened for public comment this week.

Here’s the crux: the new DOE rules aim to ensure “reliability and resiliency” of power generation in America. By rewarding electricity producers who are able to generate continuous and steady power supply.

There are a couple of key pieces to the exact wording here. One being that electricity grid operators will be required to provide “full cost recovery” to some power-producing facilities. Specifically, those power plants that “maintain 90-day on-site fuel supplies”.

That basically means nuclear and coal-fired plants. With these solid-fuel driven facilities being the only ones that keep large fuel inventories on-site — unlike alternative generation methods like natural gas, hydro and renewables.

Very good news - it was cheap reliable energy that lifted us out of the stone age. The more we have, the better our standard of living and quality of life. Also, the more we can spread this around to developing nations and raise them up as well.

Given my druthers, I would go 100% nuclear but that is just my two cents.

Seriously? For fsck's sake - Middle East

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If it was not for their oil reserves, these nations would be nothing. From Zero Hedge:

Oil To Hit $100? Half Of Saudi Oil Output Shut After Drone Strikes Cripple World's Largest Oil Processing Facility
Update: The WSJ is out with an update hinting at just how much the price of oil is set to soar when trading reopens late on Sunday after the Saudi Houthi false-flag drone attack on the largest Saudi oil processing plant:

Saudi Arabia is shutting down about half of its oil output after apparently coordinated drone strikes hit Saudi production facilities, people familiar with the matter said, in what Yemen’s Houthi rebels described as one of their largest-ever attacks inside the kingdom.

The production shutdown amounts to a loss of about five million barrels a day, the people said, roughly 5% of the world’s daily production of crude oil. The kingdom produces 9.8 million barrels a day.

And while Aramco is assuring it can restore output quickly, in case it can't the world is looking at a production shortfall of as much as 150MM barrels monthly, which - all else equal - could send oil soaring into the triple digits. Just what the Aramco IPO ordered.

And a bit more:

Fires burned into the morning daylight hours, with explosions also reported at the Khurais oil field, in what the Houthis said was a successful attack involving ten drones. "These attacks are our right, and we warn the Saudis that our targets will keep expanding," a rebel military spokesman said on Houthi-operated Al Masirah TV.

Glad to hear that President Trump is opening up ANWR to drilling. Now if we would just go forward with nuclear, things would be wonderful and we could kiss that 9th century culture goodbye.

Great news - new power reactors

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Wonderful news - I love this current administration. From Neutron Bytes:

Idaho National Lab Gets DOE Charter for Test and Demonstration of Advanced Reactors
In the late 1940s the federal government established the National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS) at a site on the dusty volcanic plain of the Arco desert about 50 miles west of Idaho Falls, ID. Now some 70 years later the government has again turned to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to create the National Reactor Innovation Center (NRIC).

The new initiative will support the development of advanced nuclear energy technologies by harnessing the world-class capabilities of the DOE national laboratory system. It will be a test and demonstration center for these technologies and it will involve public / private partnerships with firms that want to bring these technologies to a mature enough level to attract investors and customers.

NRIC will be led by Idaho National Laboratory and builds upon the successes of DOE’s Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear (GAIN) initiative. GAIN connects industry with the national labs to accelerate the development and commercialization of advanced nuclear technologies. NRIC will coordinate with industry, other federal institutions, the national labs, and universities on testing and demonstrating these concepts.

The NRIC will provide private sector technology developers the necessary support to test and demonstrate their reactor concepts and assess their performance. This will help accelerate the licensing and commercialization of these new nuclear energy systems.

Nuclear is the way to go for power generation. alt.energy is a stupid rathole. This is fantastic news.

Great news - England and Energy

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Wonderful - from the Mirror:

Tories plan mini-nuclear reactors for the North in major change to energy policy
A series of mini-nuclear reactors could be built across the North in a major power scheme.

Plants could generate energy in Yorkshire, Cumbria, Lancashire and Cheshire under a project spearheaded by Rolls-Royce for “small modular reactors”.

The Government is pumping in £18 million so the firm can develop the design of the reactors.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson is expected to formally announce the plan in September and the first plant could be up and running within the next 15 years.

Good news - of all the "traditional" designs, SMRs are the very best of the lot. This is what the US and Russian navies have been doing for their ships and submarines. My personal choice would be for liquid thorium but that is another technology to be developed although we had a bunch of them back in the 1960's.. Thorium does not go Ka-boom like uranium and the 1960's was the height of the atomic weapons race and the US decided to not operate two nuclear supply chains. Uranium is about as common as platinum in the earth's crust; and about as expensive. Thorium is about as common as lead. Dirt cheap.

Seeing the light - Michael Moore

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Great news from journalist Don Surber:

Michael Moore grows up
Michael Moore finally grew up. He now realizes Captain Planet was just a front man for green energy boondoggles paid for by taxpayers.

The Associated Press reported, "What if alternative energy isn’t all it’s cracked up to be? That’s the provocative question explored in the documentary Planet of the Humans, which is backed and promoted by filmmaker Michael Moore and directed by one of his longtime collaborators. It premiered last week at his Traverse City Film Festival.

"The film, which does not yet have distribution, is a low-budget but piercing examination of what the filmmakers say are the false promises of the environmental movement and why we’re still “addicted” to fossil fuels.

"Director Jeff Gibbs takes on electric cars, solar panels, windmills, biomass, biofuel, leading environmentalist groups like the Sierra Club, and even figures from Al Gore and Van Jones, who served as Barack Obama’s special adviser for green jobs, to 350.org leader Bill McKibben, a leading environmentalist and advocate for grassroots climate change movements."

This looks like an interesting movie - the facts are pesky. alt.energy is not economically viable without huge taxpayer-funded subsidies. Nuclear (modern designs) are incredibly safe and cheap to build. The whole alternative energy movement has been a political scam from day one. Some people got very rich off it.

England's new Prime Minister

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Liking the cut of his jib - from the UK Times and Star:

New PM Boris Johnson supports calls for a nuclear renaissance
On his first day addressing his new Government, Copeland MP Trudy Harrison asked him: “Does the Prime Minister agree that the time is now for a nuclear renaissance and that Copeland is the centre of nuclear excellence?”

Mr Johnson replied: “It is time for a nuclear renaissance and I believe passionately that nuclear must be part of our energy mix and she is right to campaign for it and it will help us to meet our carbon targets.”

It comes in the week that the Government also launched a consultation into funding large-scale nuclear power stations and a proposed £18million investment into small modular reactors (SMR).

Wonderful - if you are going to use conventional technologies, the SMR is by far the best way to go. Other forms of alt.energy are totally impractical and very bad for the environment when looking at the whole picture.

Yes! More nuclear

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Great news from the Idaho News:

Plan to build first small US nuclear reactors in Idaho advances
A plan to build the nation's first small modular nuclear reactors to produce commercial power is a step closer.

A Utah-based energy cooperative said Wednesday that it has sales contracts for enough carbon-free power to begin a license application process with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to build the reactors in eastern Idaho.

Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems already has agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy to build the reactors at the federal agency's 890-square-mile (2,300-square-kilometer) site that includes the Idaho National Laboratory.

A small modular nuclear reactor can produce about 60 megawatts, or enough to power more than 50,000 homes. The proposed project includes 12 small modular reactors.

The energy cooperative says it has carbon-free contracts for more than 150 megawatts. Its goal is to begin construction on the reactors in 2023.

The down side is that these are conventional reactors - 60 year old designs with the attendant problems.

The up side is that these are a lot smaller than the 1,200 megawatt units that are being built. If something goes wrong, things move a lot slower so it will be easier to correct. Plus, by using a lot of small cheap identical cores, you have the same redundancy that the US Navy enjoys. They use a lot of identical cores and if there is an issue with a coolant pump bearing or such, they figure out a solution and replace all of them. End of problem. The Navy's safety record is spotless.

My ideal nuke is a LFTR but that is a different story.

Fusion power in the news

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From technology website The Drive:

Skunk Works' Exotic Fusion Reactor Program Moves Forward With Larger, More Powerful Design
Lockheed Martin's Skunk Works is building a new, more capable test reactor as it continues to move ahead with its ambitious Compact Fusion Reactor program, or CFR. Despite slower than expected progress, the company remains confident the project can produce practical results, which would completely transform how power gets generated for both military and civilian purposes.

Aviation Week was first to report the updates on the CFR program, including that Lockheed Martin is in the process of constructing its newest experimental reactor, known as the T5, on July 19, 2019. The company's legendary California-based Skunk Works advanced projects office is in charge of the effort and had already built four different test reactor designs, as well as a number of subvariants, since the program first became public knowledge in 2014. The War Zone has been following news of this potentially revolutionary program very closely in recent years.

A lot more at the site - I love that this research is being privatly funded and that this fifth unit is large enough to be self-sustaining. Nuclear is the way to go for energy generation. All of the alt.energy sources (wind / solar) are just pissing taxpayer money away and are worse for the environment than coal.

Sticking it to Russia - oil

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Russia is a cash-poor nation. Their only real source of hard currency is their oil exports to Europe. From Marine Link:

U.S. Oil Makes it to Ukraine, a blow to Moscow
U.S. crude exports are gaining traction in Europe as even Ukraine turns into a significant consumer of American barrels at the expense of Russian supplies amid heightened U.S. political pressure on Moscow and problems over contaminated Russian oil.

Ukraine this month received its first ever barrels from the United States, according to Refinitiv Eikon flows data, as the tanker Wisdom Venture unloaded 80,000 tonnes of Bakken crude in Odessa on July 6 for the Kremenchug refinery, the port said.

Russia often struggles to export oil from the Black Sea via the narrow Turkish Bosphorus and Dardanelles straits due to congestion, making the arrival of the U.S. crude into the Black Sea from the Mediterranean even more extraordinary.

The oil was sold by BP to Ukrtatnafta, sources said, adding Ukrtatnafta will receive a further similar amount of U.S. crude around July 24, and more purchases were likely in August.

Yeah - President Trump and Vladimir Putin were in collusion. Riiiiggghhhhtttt... Trump is drinking Vlad's milkshake and there is not a thing that Pooty-poot can do about it.

Morons in California

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What idiots - from the East Bay Express:

That Old Gas Stove Is Not Your Friend
As the United States has begun transitioning away from the use of coal and petroleum as a source of electricity and fuel, natural gas has been viewed as a relatively benign fossil fuel. After all, natural gas produces less carbon dioxide when burned than those other fossil fuels. It remains the energy source in about half of California's buildings.

But scientists have increasingly warned that methane, the main component of natural gas, is itself a key heat-trapping gas — 84 times more potent than carbon dioxide in the first twenty years after release, according to the Environmental Defense Fund. In addition to the carbon dioxide created by its burning, the inevitable leaks as natural gas is extracted and shipped, make gas a serious climate threat in its own right.

State policy calls for the electrification of buildings — the source of about 10 percent of California's greenhouse gas emissions, mostly from natural gas. Several state agencies and many cities and counties are working on a variety of programs to promote electrification. But none have gone as far as the ordinance scheduled to come before the Berkeley City Council on July 9.

Once again, the City of Berkeley is considering a groundbreaking environmental policy: This time it's a ban on natural gas hookups in all new buildings, starting January 1, 2020.

Aside from the fact that a flame is a lot better to cook on than an electric hob (better heat control), are they seriously proposing electric resistance heating for cooking. Don't they realize that 70% of the electricity in this nation comes from coal and 25%+ from the combination of nuke, hydro and natural gas turbines. About 3% of this nation's electricity comes from "renewables" and it is our tax dollars that are paying the subsidies to make these work. Burn coal to cook food. Stupid self-centered idiots.

From Associated Press:

Arizona fire highlights challenges for energy storage
Arizona’s largest electric company installed massive batteries near neighborhoods with a large number of solar panels, hoping to capture some of the energy from the afternoon sun to use after dark.

Arizona Public Service has been an early adopter of battery storage technology seen as critical for the wider deployment of renewable energy and for a more resilient power grid.

But an April fire and explosion at a massive battery west of Phoenix that sent eight firefighters and a police officer to the hospital highlighted the challenges and risks that can arise as utilities prepare for the exponential growth of the technology.

Sure - capture magic pixies from the sun and store them in a battery that can blow up if mishandled and requires lots of toxic chemicals and rare earth elements to build. Great idea there poindexter...

Madness in New York State - climate

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The stupid is strong with these people - from The New York Times:

New York to Approve One of the World’s Most Ambitious Climate Plans
New York lawmakers have agreed to pass a sweeping climate plan that calls for the state to all but eliminate its greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, envisioning an era when gas-guzzling cars, oil-burning heaters and furnaces would be phased out, and all of the state’s electricity would come from carbon-free sources.

Under an agreement reached this week between legislative leaders and Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, the Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act would require the state to slash its planet-warming pollution 85 percent below 1990 levels by 2050, and offset the remaining 15 percent, possibly through measures to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

This is so stupid - it burns! There is no carbon-free source of energy with the exception of Nuclear - clean and safe nuclear. The basic designs of the reactors in use today were sketched out on cocktail napkins over 60 years ago. There are newer and much much safer technologies out there. Wind and solar are not baseload - they vary with the weather and clouds. For every 1,000MW of wind turbines out there, there is also a 1,000MW natural gas turbine generator running on hot-standby.

As for removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere? They are seriously proposing to remove plant food from the environment? CO2 is one of the key ingredients of photosynthesis - No CO2, no plants.

No mention is made if they will also ban outside sources of electricity and some high-carbon materials (beef, steel, etc...)

alt.energy in the news

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Sobering dose of reality from Germany by way of Forbes Magazine:

The Reason Renewables Can't Power Modern Civilization Is Because They Were Never Meant To
Over the last decade, journalists have held up Germany’s renewables energy transition, the Energiewende, as an environmental model for the world.

“Many poor countries, once intent on building coal-fired power plants to bring electricity to their people, are discussing whether they might leapfrog the fossil age and build clean grids from the outset,” thanks to the Energiewendewrote a New York Times reporter in 2014.

With Germany as inspiration, the United Nations and World Bank poured billions into renewables like wind, solar, and hydro in developing nations like Kenya.

But then, last year, Germany was forced to acknowledge that it had to delay its phase-out of coal, and would not meet its 2020 greenhouse gas reduction commitments. It announced plans to bulldoze an ancient church and forest in order to get at the coal underneath it.

Much more at the site. Nice idea but it simply does not pencil out without huge government subsidies (our tax dollars at work). Plus, because it is not a reliable source, the utilities have to maintain a backup generator running all the time on "hot standby" for when the wind dies.

From the Houston Chronicle:

Baker Hughes chooses Permian Basin to debut 'electric frack' technology
Houston oilfield service company Baker Hughes is using the Permian Basin in West Texas to debut a fleet of new turbines that use excess natural gas from a drilling site to power hydraulic fracturing equipment — reducing flaring, carbon dioxide emissions, people and equipment in remote locations.

Flaring is the burning off of unusable gases as a byproduct of oil extraction. What they are planning:

Baker Hughes estimates 500 hydraulic fracturing fleets are deployed in shale basins across the United States and Canada. Most of them are powered by trailer-mounted diesel engines. Each fleet consumes more than 7 million gallons of diesel per year, emits an average of 70,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide and require 700,000 tanker truck loads of diesel supplied to remote sites, according to Baker Hughes.

“Electric frack enables the switch from diesel-driven to electrical-driven pumps powered by modular gas turbine generating units,” Simonelli said. “This alleviates several limiting factors for the operator and the pressure pumping company such as diesel truck logistics, excess gas handling, carbon emissions and the reliability of the pressure pumping operation.”

Sounds like win/win to me...

Fun times in California

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The progressives have spent all of their money on social justice programs with little to show for it (human feces, homelessness). The only problem is that this takes money away from basic infrastructure and although you can let things slide for ten years or so, any longer and it will take a lot more money to rebuild than if things were properly maintained in the first place.

Case in point - from Denny at Grouchy Old Cripple.
GOC links to an article at the Wall Street Journal which is now behind a pay-wall:

California Blackouts
California continues to descend into Third World status. The latest step is planned blackouts.

No U.S. utility has ever blacked out so many people on purpose. PG&E says it could knock out power to as much as an eighth of the state’s population for as long as five days when dangerously high winds arise. Communities likely to get shut off worry PG&E will put people in danger, especially the sick and elderly, and cause financial losses with slim hope of compensation.

Blackouts. They’re not for Third World nations anymore, just states run by Dimocrats.

In October, in a test run of sorts, PG&E for the first time cut power to several small communities over wildfire concerns, including the small Napa Valley town of Calistoga, for about two days. Emergency officials raced door-to-door to check on elderly residents, some of whom relied on electric medical devices. Grocers dumped spoiling inventory. Hotels lost business.

Too bad. So sad.

PG&E is “essentially shifting all of the burden, all of the losses onto everyone else,” said Dylan Feik, who was Calistoga city manager until earlier this month.

The Utility News website: Utility Dive has more:

PG&E revises wildfire mitigation plan to remove hard inspection and improvement deadlines
PG&E's wildfire mitigation plans are facing fresh scrutiny after the utility's revised proposal noted the scope of proactive de-energization efforts and sought to remove inspection and action deadlines.

I love that bureaucratic double-speak: proactive de-energization efforts - would it hurt them too much to just say intentional blackouts? And then there is this howler: and sought to remove inspection and action deadlines  - we want you to trust us when we say that everything is just fine and dandy. 

A little bit about scope:

The revised plan also provided more details about the potential for widespread blackouts, in the event it must proactively shut down some transmission lines in times of high wind. PG&E said it has "expanded the scope" of its Public Safety Power Shutoff (PSPS) program to include high voltage transmission lines.

"If these high voltage transmission lines are de-energized during a PSPS event, the interconnected nature of the grid could result in a cascading effect that causes other transmission lines and distribution lines — potentially far from the original fire-risk areas — to be de-energized," the utility said.

That means areas far from high-risk zones, like San Francisco or San Jose, could be de-energized.

This will get people's attention as well as lead to wide-scale rioting. Why didn't they just budget for known expenses for maintenence and not blow all their money on alt.energy and shutting down safe and carbon neutral nuke plants.

Bill Gates on alt.energy

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Bill skewers alternative energy:

Tip of the hat to Vanderleun

California utility Pacific Gas and Electric was responsible for the major wildfires last summer. They deferred basic maintenence for twelve years and it was an equipment failure that triggered the blazes. They are facing bankruptcy to try to get out of paying massive claims. And now this - from ABC News:

Bankrupt California utility wants to give $235M in bonuses
Pacific Gas & Electric Corp. sought a judge's approval to pay $235 million in bonuses to thousands of employees despite the California utility's bankruptcy.

The money is intended to provide incentives to workers and will not be distributed if the company doesn't meet safety and financial goals, PG&E said in a court filing Wednesday. It said the bonus program has been restructured with its Chapter 11 case in mind and puts a greater emphasis on safety performance.

"In deliberately designing the plan this way, the debtors are sending a clear message to their workforce that the safety of the communities the debtors serve and of their employees is of paramount concern during the restructuring process and into the future," attorneys for the utility said in court documents.

Talk about poor management - they have to bribe their employees with bonuses for them to comply with safety regulations.

Great article at Forbes Magazine:

Nuclear Power Always Ready For Extreme Weather
As Polar Vortices, Bomb Cyclones and massive hurricanes pummel America more and more often, nuclear power plants keep on putting out maximum power when all other sources can’t.

For the last month, the Pacific Northwest’s only nuclear power plant has been under a “No Touch” order to help keep the heat on as record cold and snow covered the region. I was stuck in my house for eight days.

As reported by Annette Cary of the Tri-City Herald, the Bonneville Power Administration, which markets the electricity produced at the nuclear plant near Richland, asked Energy Northwest, the operator of the power plant, not to do anything that would prevent the plant from producing 100% power at all times during an unusually cold February across the state that increased the demand for electricity – no maintenance activities, even on its turbine generator and in the transformer yard. Don’t do anything that would stop the reliable and constant power output of nuclear.

“No Touch” is requested by BPA when unusually hot or cold weather increases the demand for electricity, notes Mike Paoli, spokesman for Energy Northwest. Many regional transmission and system operators across the United States ask nuclear plants to keep running during extreme weather because nuclear plants are the least affected by bad weather.

And these reactors are the old designs - first sketched out on cocktail napkins seventy years ago. There are newer designs that have a lot less problems with waste - in fact, they can use conventional nuclear waste as fuel. These designs are also walk-away safe - they can not melt down. If there is a total system failure, they shut themselves down and remain in a stable state. They do not operate at high pressures so no containment vessel is needed - much cheaper to build.

Here is a five minute excerpt on LFTR:

Global warming - a two-fer

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This winter is not giving up anytime soon. Two headlines:

March roars in like a lion: Millions to endure coast-to-coast snow, then 'punishing' blast of record cold

Record-Breaking Cold Blast in U.S. Will Roil Power Markets Next Week

The second links to an article in Bloomberg. Renewable energy does not work well during times of extreme weather - just when you need to have more energy for heating or cooling. There is a lot at the article including this sobering graph showing the cost of energy delivered to Sumas, WA - a town on the border with Canada, about 14 miles from Maple Falls:

20190302-power.jpg

If we were using nuclear power, the cost of power would remain relatively constant regardless of what was happening outside. Not the case with solar or wind.

Some common sense from California

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Nice to see common sense prevail for once - from The Daily Wire:

But Climate Change! Largest California County Bans Mega Solar Farms
If climate change is the dire threat the Left portrays it to be, then the largest county in ultra-left-wing California is definitely not setting the example: Officials from San Bernardino County just killed the construction of a mega solar farm, the Los Angeles Times reports.

"California's largest county has banned the construction of large solar and wind farms on more than 1 million acres of private land, bending to the will of residents who say they don’t want renewable energy projects industrializing their rural desert communities northeast of Los Angeles," the outlet reports.

The ban passed the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors 4-1, putting up a serious barrier for state lawmakers, who passed a law requiring utility companies to produce 60% of their electricity from renewable energy sources by 2030 and 100% from "climate-friendly" sources by 2045. Those measures cannot be enacted without the cooperation of local governments, the populations of which rarely support big solar and wind farms ruining their communities.

About time the govenments started listening to We The People. They are supposed to be working for us, not the highest bidder. Time for nuclear power with modern reactors. alt.energy does not work without huge government subsidies - our tax dollars.

Major milestone for energy exports - LNG

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Great news from The Tennessee Star:

Trump Admin Ecstatic with Late-Night Deal That Broke Deadlock Over Natural Gas Exports
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) broke a two-year partisan deadlock Thursday night to approve a liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal in Louisiana.

Top Department of Energy (DOE) officials said this was a major breakthrough that will alleviate a growing problem for U.S. energy producers — a lack of export infrastructure.

“We have been promoting US energy around the world and today’s decision by the FERC is a very important one,” DOE Deputy Secretary Dan Brouillette told The Daily Caller News Foundation in an interview.

And a bit more:

Once complete, Calcasieu Pass terminal will export up 12 million metric tons of LNG a year. Brouillette said the project already has buyers, including in Europe, waiting for American natural gas.

Hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling spurred an oil and natural gas boom over the past decade, making the U.S. the world’s top hydrocarbon producer. However, a limiting factor on oil and gas is the lack of export terminals and pipelines.

And do not forget VP Joe Biden's famous three letter word J. O. B. S.

Russia provides the bulk of LNG to Europe and this is one of their primary sources of cash flow. Offer an alternative and we pull their fangs a bit. Level the playing field.

Great news - Nuclear Reactors

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Hopeful story at Grist:

Next-gen Nukes
Back in 2009, Simon Irish, an investment manager in New York, found the kind of opportunity that he thought could transform the world while — in the process — transforming dollars into riches.

Irish saw that countries around the globe needed to build a boggling amount of clean-power projects to replace their fossil fuel infrastructure, while also providing enough energy for rising demand from China, India, and other rapidly growing countries. He realized that it would be very hard for renewables, which depend on the wind blowing and the sun shining, to do everything. And he knew that nuclear power, the only existing form of clean energy that could fill the gaps, was too expensive to compete with oil and gas.

But then, at a conference in 2011, he met an engineer with an innovative design for a nuclear reactor cooled by molten salt. If it worked, Irish figured, it could not only solve the problems with aging nuclear power, but also provide a realistic path to dropping fossil fuels.

“The question was, ‘Can we do better than the conventional reactors that were commercialized 60 years ago?” Irish recalled. “And the answer was, ‘Absolutely.’”

A bit about the technology (Irish started a company "Terrestrial Energy" which is trying to get a salt reactor online before 2030):

Terrestrial is far from alone. Dozens of nuclear startups are popping up around the country, aiming to solve the well-known problems with nuclear power — radioactive waste, meltdowns, weapons proliferation, and high costs.

There are reactors that burn nuclear waste. There are reactors designed to destroy isotopes that could be made into weapons. There are small reactors that could be built inexpensively in factories. So many ideas!

Good news indeed. These reactors can not melt down - they are walk-away safe.

Great news - nuclear energy

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When they say fleet, they are talking about the installed base of commercial power plants, not ships.
From The Daily Caller:

LAWMAKERS OVERWHELMINGLY VOTE TO MODERNIZE US NUCLEAR FLEET
Congress passed bipartisan legislation that aims to streamline the regulatory process for commercial nuclear plants, bringing relief to an industry that has witnessed decline and uncertainty.

The Nuclear Energy Innovation and Modernization Act was approved in the House of Representatives by wide margins Friday, clearing the chamber by 361 to 10. The Senate had already approved the bill on Thursday by a voice vote.

Introduced by Wyoming GOP Sen. John Barrasso and co-sponsored by a number of Republicans and Democrats alike, the Nuclear Energy Innovation and Modernization Act calls for a number of reforms that would unburden the industry. The legislation streamlines how the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates facilities by improving licensing procedures and giving licensees more transparency on how the agency spends its money. Additionally, it encourages investment in nuclear research and supports the development new technology in labs around the country.

The end goal of the bill is to make the development and commercialization of nuclear technology more affordable.

Hopefully, there are provisions for modernizing the design and exploring liquid salt reactors - specifically Thorium. Thorium is about as common as Lead in our earth - very common. Uranium is about as common as Platinum - very rare and expensive. These reactors are walk-away safe - they can not melt down.

Some great news - new oil

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A new oil find - from National Review:

Feds Discover Largest Oil, Natural-Gas Reserve in History
The federal government has discovered a massive new reserve of oil and natural gas in Texas and New Mexico that it says has the “largest continuous oil and gas resource potential ever assessed.”

“Christmas came a few weeks early this year,” Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke said of the new reserve, which is believed to have enough energy to fuel the U.S. for nearly seven years.

The report can be found here (four page PDF document): Assessment of Undiscovered Continuous Oil and Gas Resources in the Wolfcamp Shale and Bone Spring Formation of the Delaware Basin, Permian Basin Province, New Mexico and Texas, 2018

I am still waiting for new nuclear power plants - specifically LFTRs but this will tide us over.

Waking up to the reality

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Green energy is an abject lie - from Scotland's The Herald:

Blackouts, deaths and civil unrest: warning over Scotland's rush to go green
A massive gap in the electricity system caused by the closure of coal-fired power stations and growth of unpredictable renewable generation has created the real prospect of complete power failure.

According the Institution of Engineers in Scotland (IESIS), there is a rising threat of an unstable electricity supply which, left unaddressed, could result in “deaths, severe societal and industrial disruption, civil disturbance and loss of production”.

The organisation is also warning that the loss of traditional power generating stations such as Longannet, which closed in 2016, means restoring electricity in a “black start” situation – following a complete loss of power – would take several days.

Its new report into the energy system points to serious power cuts in other countries, which have resulted in civil disturbance, and warns: “A lengthy delay would have severe negative consequences – the supply of food, water, heat, money, petrol would be compromised; there would be limited communications. The situation would be nightmarish.”

Especially now that everything is pointing to another Solar Minimum. Now is not the time to be putting all of our energy generation options into one unstable basket.

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